While many may view the art of poetry as a dull, dreary creative medium of the past, it is important to realize, especially during the month of April, that poetry is alive and thriving. While print poetry is still celebrated, especially by companies such as Write Bloody Publishing and Button Poetry, there is also a huge cultural return to the art of oration.

Spoken word poetry gained popularity in mainstream culture through HBO’s Def Poetry Jam, which was broadcasted from 2002-2007. Before this show, slam and spoken word were art forms contained to small venues and literary cafes. Since the show aired, so many young poets have been inspired to find their voices through this unique medium, and recognition and reverence toward this art form have increased exponentially.

I have been a writer for as long as I can remember, but it wasn’t until high school, when I discovered the art of spoken word, that I realized the power in my craft. I was so moved by the artists I watched online after school every day, memorizing every word of their poems so I could practice recitations in the mirror for hours. During my college years, as my craft took me to national competitions and small, quirky venues, I was able to meet so many of the individuals whose work inspired me to follow the small but deepening sound of my own voice. Sharing laughter and tears of gratitude with individuals such as Rachel McKibbens, Regie Cabico, Caroline Harvey, Jeanann Verlee, Marty McConnell, and many others are some of moments in my life I am the most grateful for.

Today, as Uno Alla Volta’s copywriter, I get to share a similar joy as I travel the world, meeting our artisans and translating their complex and beautiful stories into the copy you read across our print and digital mediums. My passion for my job comes from these memories of the power of storytelling and my deep-rooted belief that poetry can, and will, change the world someday.

-Anna, Associate Marketing Manager- Content

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Me, at a poetry reading in 2013 (Photo by Jade Greene: Reverse Images)